Designing Online Learning Tutorials - NLA/NSLA 2013
10/20/2013 05:52:00 PM | Author: Christa

Holly Duggan, Love Library, University of Nebraska at Lincoln

Nebraska Library Association/Nebraska School Librarians Association Annual Conference 2013
October 10, 2013

Comes out of the ALA Emerging Leader program project.

What’s the point?

When my learner is done with this tutorial they will be able to do… Then you will be able to focus your message of the tutorial.

Involve your learner in the tutorial. Engage/entertain, keep their attention. Doesn’t need to be crazy or distracting. Use audio narration.

Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler. Know your audience. What do they already know and what do they need to know?

Tools

Prezi – more flexible than Powerpoint. Not as linear. Free account. Templates. Can import a PPT you already have and modify it to Prezi. Can be printed out as slides or a PDF.

Popplet – for concept mapping, word clouds, timelines. Multiple people can collaborate. Good for group projects. Can add images, YouTube videos to each box – they will play right in the popplet. Can change color of boxes to organize concepts.

Glogster – digital poster, graphic blog. Start with a theme, but can customize everything. Add text, videos, graphics (kind of like clip art) in Glogster or from your computer, pictures. Save publicly, tag so others can find it on Glogster site. Or can save privately for yourself. Share to social media. Embed.

Jing – screen recorder for screencasting. Software you download to your computer. Icon is always available at the top of your screen, to quickly capture a screenshot or record. Can do some basic editing after. Can record up to 5 minute videos. If you have a microphone, it will also record your voice. Can insert your video into your Prezi, Popplet and Glogster.

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Gaming & Game Programming in the Library - ARSL 2013
10/09/2013 12:07:00 AM | Author: Christa

Josh Barnes and Jezmynne Dene, Portneuf District Library, Chubbuck, ID
List of Popular Games and Console Requirements on ARSL Handouts page

Association for Rural & Small Libraries 2013 Annual Conference 
September 26, 2013

Why Game?

Bring in more patrons who would have never thought of coming into the library before.

Social opportunities for kids who normally wouldn’t meet new friends.

Librarian Munchkin
Librarian Munchkin at ARSL 2013
Make connections with patrons – turn ‘users’ into ‘patrons’. Kids who started out just coming in to use the computers learn that the people there can help them with other things, like homework, finding new things to read.

Getting started. What do I need?

Need an excited staff member.

Community games

Find a gaming group that already exists, invite them into the library. Rule – can’t close anyone out of their game – anyone who comes in must be allowed to join.

Board game nights – families – find simple games to play – Tsuro – good for both young children and adults. Cooperative games – for more older adults. Instead of fighting against each other you fight against the board – Red November.

Card games – Munchkin. Deck Building – Dominion. Dice – Quariers.

Strategy – Chess, Checkers, Settlers of Catan.

Always-On Gaming

Limited staff involvement needed. Kids and adults can walk in, play a bit, and then walk out. No end point. Xbox Kinect – no controllers needed.

Sandbox – Minecraft – 1 hour per day allowed, on Xbox, up to 4 at a time can play. In last year, had 6000 children play. Terraria – 2 D – more intricate. Good for older kids who might get bored with Minecraft

Party Games – Wii Sports, etc.

Legos – not just gaming, can do programing around it. STEM programs. Communication – teach another person to build something.

Video Game Night

More competitive, kids can get rowdier. Tweens/teens. Some early 20s. Works best on Friday nights.

Turn based – Worms. Multiple kids on same computer can play. Lots of games online.

Real Time Strategy RTS – Warcraft 3. No turns, about managing time/resources. Can take 2-3 hours.

Co-op – Castle Crashers. Instead of fighting each other, players team up and fight the game.

First Person Shooter FPS – first person perspective, realistic point of view. Call of Duty, Halo. Halo – less realistic, so causes fewer complaints from parents. Halo – can change parameters so it’s not all about shooting each other – races, flying – cant touch the ground.

Gaming Platforms and Cost

Board games – cheapest, but more complex ones will cost more. $10 for Sorry. Dominion – $40-50.

Computer – most versatile, but hardest to manage. Need someone who knows networking and computers to get them set up and talking to each other. Need good video and sound cards - $50-130. Older games will work fine on older computers (2003). Minecraft – library licensing – MinecraftEdu. 30 computers for about $500.

Wii – $150. $35 - extra controllers. Larger TV works best for multiplayer – $400 for 42 inch.

Xbox 360 – $250 for bundle with Kinect. Price may drop soon with new Xbox One coming out.

Challenges to Consider

Parental Complaints – do age limits. All night gaming – no one under 12. Permission slips – had a lawyer look at it (Example Parental Consent Form on ARSL Handouts page). Limit type of games – no FPS. Use the ratings – Everyone and Teen only.

Sharing – too many kids and not enough controllers? Have board games available while they’re waiting. Offer books. Time limits. Have games in open area where people can see – will decrease problems when they know someone will see them.

Broken games – missing pieces. Library absorbs cost of replacing game rather than charging patron.

No one shows up? This is where the excited staff member comes in. Lock ins – teens like it – background checks on staff, permission slips, 8pm-8am, 20-30 kids, 2 staff, food. Change up the games you offer.

Management Buy In

You have to be committed – who is the excited staff member. Long term commitment. How long will you plan to keep the program up? Sustain the health of the project.

Be prepared with your proposal. Have a couple of different ideas. Gear it to your community. Include the costs – games, food, staff time. Requirements – age level, expertise. Make sure you have Assessment metrics – how are you going to tell management this program was a success? Be passionate – enthusiasm, commitment, details.

Identify Community Partners

Don’t compete with them, work with them. Chess guys – what do you need? Library bought 6 chess sets. Give them space, provide snacks.

Wal-Mart willing to donate? Donate PC, games. Goodwill – games that don’t sell. Tell them the goal is to interact with the community, get teens a safe space on Friday nights. Garage sales.

What ifs?

How are you going to deal with problems, like community members who think games are making children into Satanists? Show them that you have 30 kids in the library, safe and having fun and socializing instead of running loose in the town.

Get evidence – your own and studies – Google Scholar. Benefits of gaming by universities.

Success stories – keep track of kids who have made great improvements due to coming to the library.

Involve parents and guardians. Talk to them. Get their input.

Assessment metrics – attendance, program counts. Cost per attendee. User and parent feedback. Give it time to grow. 6 months to a year may be needed for marketing and developing community connections.

How long to get staff up to speed and trained? Staff training is necessary. Make sure even the 80 year old who works 10 hours a week at least knows what a Kinect is. Did it as part of all staff day. 


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Super Hero Leadership - ARSL 2013
10/06/2013 11:57:00 PM | Author: Christa

Lisa Lewis, Huachuca City (AZ) Public Library

Association for Rural & Small Libraries 2013 Annual Conference 

September 27, 2013

Characteristics of superheroes


Spider-Man

Lighthearted – OK as a leader to joke around a bit. But don’t make slanderous remarks about anybody, especially mayor, town council, etc. Put a stop to gossiping. Know when to be serious and when is the right time to joke.

Clever – rearrange stacks, furniture. Seek out grants. Partner with businesses – sponsor a program at your library.

Kindness – recognize the value of your staff. Make sure they understand that you appreciate what they’re doing. Remember what it was like to be in their shoes. Use kind words. Give them second chances. Give praise and recognition often for the jobs that they’re doing.

Overwhelmed – take a break. Don’t become defensive when you become overwhelmed. Don’t let it control your emotions. You can’t control the situation, but you can control how you react to the situation. One thing at a time.

Superman

Strong sense of purpose – believe in what you are doing with all your heart. Be all in. Figure out what your purpose is at your library. Remember it and remind yourself.

Fairness – no favoritism. Treat all staff equally. Be consistent. Listen to your staff. Be present during a conversation – listen and understand what you are being told. Be willing to adjust. Can’t put all staff in same category. Set expectations – be very clear. All staff should have up-to-date and correct job descriptions.

Confident – in yourself. In your abilities. Sound sure of yourself. Come across as if you are in control of every situation. Be clear about what you know and what you don’t know. Fine line between being confident and begin arrogant.

Sometimes feels insecure – it’s OK. Showing it will sabotage any influence you have over your staff. Don’t dwell on things you haven’t done. Think about all the positive things you have done in your library. Dress like you’re confident – feel good about yourself. Looking confident will give you motivation and make you more confident.

Batman

Dependable – be on time, try not to be late. Try not to leave early often. Try not to call in sick often. Set the example. Do what you say you are going to do. Under promise and over deliver.

Devotion to mission – make sure your staff knows you are devoted to your library and why. They will become devoted too. Know what your community needs, and be devoted to supplying it to them. Walk the talk – everyone who knows you, knows you are devoted to the library. Be mission dedicated. How to get staff devoted - Give staff a special project that requires commitment to see it thru. Be available to your staff to listen and be open to their ideas.

Endurance – pace yourself. Determination without a plan isn’t going to work. Running a library isn’t a sprint, it’s a marathon.

Fails on occasion – you will fail. But fail up – how? Did I do everything possible to make this work? No? start again. Think of failure as an experiment. Try again. Ask yourself if you would do the project again, would you? Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again. But this time, more intelligently. Use what you learned.

Captain America

Conviction – believing in something with everything you’ve got. Your conviction should be strong on your library’s core values and purpose, your staff. Create a positive library experience for everyone. To add value to your library – make it the center to your community. Have conviction about the ultimate purpose of your library – to serve your community. Have conviction where it matters.

Protector – what are we protecting at the library? The gift of literacy. Summer reading, book clubs, partnering with schools. Gift of imagination. Knowledge – free acces to information isn’t a privilege, it’s a necessity. Information – we’ve become a solution for our communities when they need help with getting a job, etc.

Courage – Try courage - try something. Trust courage – confidence in your staff, trust that they are going to do what you asked them to do. Tell courage – raise difficult issue, provide thoughtful feedback. Share unpopular opinions. Courageous leaders try more, trust more, tell more.

Finds a way to succeed despite limitations – recognize your limitations and decide it they are real or not.

Captain Sunshine

Makes people smile – approach job every day with a smile on your face and make it your mission to have all of your patrons leave with a smile in their face too.

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Build Library Awareness by Engaging Your Community - ARSL 2013
10/06/2013 04:45:00 PM | Author: Christa
Jennifer Powell, Geek the Library

Association for Rural & Small Libraries 2013 Annual Conference

September 26, 2013

Awareness and Engagement

Advocacy – is a conversation. Taking your library anywhere you go out in the community and talking it up. This is basic advocacy. Libraries are a brand. Market the total value of the library – everything you do that community might not know about.

Change the library perception. Educate the public about how the library is funded. About 70% of elected officials think the library is amply funded.

Show that the library is transformational, not just informational.

Talk about how your library is the total package for the community.

Only 37% of voters say they would support library at the ballot box – From Awareness to Funding, OCLC Report, 2008.

What’s the answer? Create internal and external library advocates.

Keep the library on your mind all year round. Pop-up libraries – take the library on the road – farmers markets, grocery store. Anywhere people gather – many supporters may never use the library, but will support it during voting time.

Make connections. Go to city council meetings, Kiwanis, influential community members. Get them to talk up the library.

Integrate messaging. Talk to a variety people in a variety of ways.

Share statistics to show where funding comes from. Expenditures, Circulation, Programming.

Use social media.

Capture and feature compelling stories. Tell why your library is making a vibrant community and what you have to offer. Highlight and showcase your library.

Empower your staff. They can be your biggest advocates.

Create library advocates in your community. What’s important to your community members? The library supports it.

Geek the Library – FREE community awareness campaign.

Three prong approach:
  1. Create awareness
  2. Generate engagement – get out into your community
  3. Encourage action 
Bill and Melinda Gates have given the campaign 4 grants. Looking for 1000 more libraries to sign up by June 2015. Staff will help you with marketing plan. Training for staff.

Campaign Kits:

Table skirt. T-shirts. Sticker rolls. CMC – campaign management center. Templates for customizable press release, artwork logos, posters, bags, bookmarks, handouts, postcards, videos. All freely downloadable.

Geekthelibrary.org – consumer site. Quiz. Downloadable screen savers.

Get.geekthelibrary.org – to sign up to get a kit. Gives access to CMC. They send you a PPT on thumb drive to explain program to staff, board.

Planning – field mangers to help you create a marketing plan. Plan to run the campaign for 6-12 month to make a lasting impact in community.

Localize – find and highlight someone whose life has been changed by the library. Put their face on your signs. Select recognizable people in your community to create interest in the library. Ask these people to be spokespeople for your library.

Go to community events with the table skirt; bring library info, stickers, bookmarks.

Library Events – Geek the Library Week, National Library Week. Geek of the Week. Adapt library programs to use the “Geek” template.

Campaign requirements:
  • Participate in a programming webinar.
  • Activate your CMC account. 
  • Complete a short survey before you launch and when you end. 
  • Notify them when you launch and end.
You don’t have to get a grant to participate – just sign up.

Accepting enrollments thru June 2014. Program materials will be available till June 2015. But you can keep going after that, just have to produce the materials yourself.

Flickr – Geek the Library pool.

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Learning in the Learning Commons: C&U/ITART Spring Meeting
6/04/2013 05:07:00 PM | Author: Christa
Learning in the Learning Commons: How UNK Moved Out of the Silos and into a Dance Hall
Keri Pearson, Dr. Ron Wirtz, University of Nebraska Kearney

College & University Section/ITART Spring Meeting
May 10, 2013

University of Nebraska Kearney Learning Commons

Vision

Siloed Existence – 2009 – writing center in the library, didn’t do much. Silo mentality kept collaboration from happening.

Peer tutoring program in student affairs building. Had outgrown the space. Noisy. Outside of academic context, viewed as remedial service when in fact they had everyone using their services – honors students, all areas.

Writing center – static student attendance, nobody had ownership of it, was part of Fine Arts, then English, all over the place.

Peer tutoring – a little growth in use over time.

Serendipity

Dean of student affairs and library dean happened to sit next to each other in a meeting and started chatting. SA – we don’t have enough space. LIB – we have space!

Deans talked about problems and need for learning commons in context of UNK mission statement. Helped get all admin support.

Why a learning commons?

Enhance social interaction between students. Knew it was not going to be a quiet space.
Coordinate several academic support services in one space.

Library open more hours than any other building on campus – could expand hours of tutoring and writing centers.

Not a place of instruction and lecturing, a space for people to collaborate.

Transition period

Library had the resources, space, technology expertise.

Focus on the LC not just being a ‘place’. Need to coordinate services.

Univ architect came up with a plan. Student tutors said no, this isn’t how we work. We need open space to work and collaborate. Took out walls and dividers.

Problems: Delay in construction. Assistant director left.

Found a temporary space. Every time they brought in a new table and chairs, a student would sit in it. It was working already!

Gate count went up. Didn’t expect that.

Now – staff meets every Friday morning to keep coordinated.

Reality 

Movable furniture – wheels on all tables and chairs. Adjustable tables and chairs – height. Ability to reconfigure the whole space in just a few minutes is very valuable. Very flexible space.

Signage around the library directing student to LC. LC more prominent on library website.

YouTube videos – Blue Tube. Intro to using UNK LC. ”What exactly is the LC?”

Fall 2011 – “Game night”. Unconventional use of the space. Got students familiar with the surroundings in its opening semester.

Fall 2012 Freshman Orientation. Almost all staff and faculty participated. Bring students in to show them that this was their space. Wanted them to feel at home and welcome. Games. Lib Quiz – like a pub quiz – emceed by faculty member.

Administrative Support – Learning Commons Coordinating Council (LCCC or LC3) - 2 partners from Student Affairs, 2 from library.

Original services – library, peer tutoring, writing center. Now - also supplemental instruction, language tables, faculty member volunteering their time to help students (no extra pay, on their own time) – mentoring the peer tutors - students majoring in their department.

ACRL Assessment in Action – UNK has been picked. Tracking referrals between LC services and library services.

Programming – undergraduate research seminars.

The Future

Integrate more technology into the space. Library had a presentation room where students can collaborate. Looking to use the glass rooms in LC for that.

Currently using Google Docs form to track library referrals to LC. Not working effectively, need to find a better mechanism.

Tutor training – want to integrate information literacy into the tutor training. Help students use the library.

Potentially gradual migration of other services to LC. ‘friendly takeover’. As more library space becomes available. One stop shop for anything students need.

Questions?

Staffing? Welcome desk staffed by students – try to get international students to show all types of students that UNK has. Students take on the responsibility for the LC. They promote the program – talk to classes, other students. Future – have a librarian in the LC, so they don’t have to go downstairs to the library all the time. 65+ student tutors. LC – 9am-9pm M-F, Sunday evenings. Tried Saturdays, but nobody came in. Writing center – appointment only, one on one. Tutors – open walk-in, but can also make an appointment.

How to separate quiet from group study areas? It can be both, depends on time of day. Alcove off to the side is quiet. Booth type seating.

Café? There is one elsewhere. They order in food. Want to have it. Trying to convince catering that there should be a Starbucks in the library.



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